— Shared 12 minuti fa - reblog

— Shared 4 ore fa - 3.195 note - via / Source - reblog

Destiny is for losers. It’s just a stupid excuse to wait for things to happen instead of making them happen.


— Shared 5 ore fa - 2.764 note - via / Source - reblog

ithotyouknew:

I’m really weird about things meant to “humanize” sex workers like “yeah, she’s a stripper, but she’s also a med student with a 4.0 GPA so don’t judge her” like, okay, so, and there’s someone in that same club who dropped out of high school and is a teenage mom, does that mean she’s lesser?


— Shared 6 ore fa - 41.856 note - via / Source - reblog
0 to 100
Drake (493.169)

0 to 100 - Drake (x)


— Shared 6 ore fa - 102 note - via / Source - reblog

— Shared 6 ore fa - 45.406 note - via / Source - reblog
albinwonderland:


"The Queen of Rap, slaying with Queen Bey!"

oh my god this photoset

albinwonderland:

"The Queen of Rap, slaying with Queen Bey!"

oh my god this photoset


— Shared 6 ore fa - 571 note - via / Source - reblog
art-of-swords:

Studies on the Ulfberht Swords
Since I got a couple of messages asking about these swords, with help from James G. Elmslie (thank you!), have some academic reading about them. Before you start glorifying, please read…
Studies Of Viking Age Swords: Metallography and Archaeology
by Eva Elisabeth Astrup & Irmelin Martens
The paper is a comment on Alan Williams’ investigation “A Metallurgical Study of some Viking Swords” published in Gladius XXIX. Williams’ paper comprises metallurgical inventigations of 44 Viking Age swords, all with the ‘ULFBERHT’ inscriptions. Such investigations, made by a well qualified metallurgist are essential to archaeology.
Unfortunately, this one has some serious limitations. In order to give a good descriptions of the quality of the swords-blade, samples showing at least the section through both the edge and the central part of the blade are necessary.
This is mostly not the case in Williams’ investigations, and he gives insufficient information about his samples. Other weak points are his group division and his interpretation of the production area for the blades containing high-carbon steel.
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

The Ulfberht sword blades reevaluated 
by Anne Stalsberg 
Readers of archaeological literature about Viking Age weapons are familiar with the male name ‘Vlfberht’ which is welded onto Viking Age sword blades. The name is in the archaeological litetrature also written ‘Ulfberh’; V and U were used interchanganly for the semi-vowel [ w ], but the sword blade signature is with one wingle expection “written” <V>. 
‘Ulfberh’ is regarded as a Frankish blacksmith and the name itself is Frankish, from the lower Rhine Area, and it is generally supposed that his sword blades were traded from the Frankish Realm to pagan Europe. During preparations for the publication of the Norwegian-Russian Sword Project it struck me that these “axioms” need a renewed discussion.
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © Gladius | Jenny Rita Blog

art-of-swords:

Studies on the Ulfberht Swords

Since I got a couple of messages asking about these swords, with help from James G. Elmslie (thank you!), have some academic reading about them. Before you start glorifying, please read…

Studies Of Viking Age Swords: Metallography and Archaeology

  • by Eva Elisabeth Astrup & Irmelin Martens

The paper is a comment on Alan Williams’ investigation “A Metallurgical Study of some Viking Swords” published in Gladius XXIX. Williams’ paper comprises metallurgical inventigations of 44 Viking Age swords, all with the ‘ULFBERHT’ inscriptions. Such investigations, made by a well qualified metallurgist are essential to archaeology.

Unfortunately, this one has some serious limitations. In order to give a good descriptions of the quality of the swords-blade, samples showing at least the section through both the edge and the central part of the blade are necessary.

This is mostly not the case in Williams’ investigations, and he gives insufficient information about his samples. Other weak points are his group division and his interpretation of the production area for the blades containing high-carbon steel.

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

The Ulfberht sword blades reevaluated 

  • by Anne Stalsberg 

Readers of archaeological literature about Viking Age weapons are familiar with the male name ‘Vlfberht’ which is welded onto Viking Age sword blades. The name is in the archaeological litetrature also written ‘Ulfberh’; V and U were used interchanganly for the semi-vowel [ w ], but the sword blade signature is with one wingle expection “written” <V>. 

Ulfberh’ is regarded as a Frankish blacksmith and the name itself is Frankish, from the lower Rhine Area, and it is generally supposed that his sword blades were traded from the Frankish Realm to pagan Europe. During preparations for the publication of the Norwegian-Russian Sword Project it struck me that these “axioms” need a renewed discussion.

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © Gladius | Jenny Rita Blog


— Shared 6 ore fa - 5 note - reblog
i just woke up and my hairs a mess but pls look at what highlighter does for ur cheekbones

i just woke up and my hairs a mess but pls look at what highlighter does for ur cheekbones


— Shared 7 ore fa - 1.375 note - via / Source - reblog

— Shared 7 ore fa - 36 note - via / Source - reblog
Little Wonders
Rob Thomas - Meet the Robinsons (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) (222)

timothyjacksondrakes:

Let it go, 

Let it roll right off your shoulder,
Don’t you know,
The hardest part is over,
Let it in,
Let your clarity define you,
In the end,
We will only just remember how it feels,


Writing: physics approved
Reading: inferno:the world at war
Researching: mali, taiwan, colombia
Dating: Kelsey


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